Canadian Social Media Marketing Management Services | Canadian Social Web Jedis | How do we avoid social media misinformation on coronavirus? There’s a tool for that.
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How do we avoid social media misinformation on coronavirus? There’s a tool for that.

With the hundreds of thousands of pieces of media, social media and online communities talking about coronavirus, it’s only expected that there’s an environment ripe for rumors and misinformation.

When we hear words in the media like “panic,” it really signifies fear. People are scared and when because they are they react much differently than they typically would. You can see this behavior playing out in the bulk buying of antibacterial products, hand sanitizers and bottled water.

The state of fear also causes a search for as many sources as possible providing information. And the information the masses crave — truth and answers, not fear-mongering and content for the sake of content.

Recently, the team at Turbine Labs expedited the launched of the COVID19 Executive Daily Briefing. This type of resource, typically an asset provided to their paying customers who hire them to monitor their brand and industry, was launched free for the foreseeable future. It was of the utmost important to founder Leigh Fatzinger, who was looking for a way to assist with both providing valuable knowledge and reducing misinformation.

How are they able to scan ALL of the traditional media and social media mentioning coronavirus?

Leigh explained, “Our AI reads 54,000 times faster than the average human and uses human validation to transform information and data chaos into meaningful intelligence. The software we developed ingests, filters, de-dupes, and enriches from hundreds of thousands of public and premium news, social media, broadcast, regulatory and financial sources.”

If you work in social media, communications or a similar industry, it’s important to look for the tools and resources to help you communicate facts, trends and important information during this time. It’s likely that your brand in some way is impacted by coronavirus — even if it’s communication to your employees and stakeholders.

The daily briefing is sent via email and is delivered in an “executive-friendly” format that outlines the most pressing (and vetted) sources of news, the social influencers most impacting conversation and the national and international news impacting finance and additional markets.

As more information continues to pour in over the coming weeks (and potentially months), it’s important to do your due diligence to vet and verify news sources prior to sharing them on your social media accounts — especially as it relates to professional brands. The worst thing you can do during this time is damage trust and credibility by sharing something that feeds fear, panic or the rumor mill.

The post How do we avoid social media misinformation on coronavirus? There’s a tool for that. appeared first on Social Media Explorer.

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Sarah Evans
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